Coach's Wednesday News Conference

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Transcript of Jets head coach Eric Mangini's news conference before Wednesday's midday practice:    

What we're doing this morning is just reviewing the things from yesterday and trying to clean those things up. There are a few other things that we added, which is going to happen as you look at things and as you look at some of the new formations or personnel groups or ways that they're attacking, and, defensively, some of the things that they've done in this last group of games, as well as historically against us.

The one thing you can count on is there is going to be something that we haven't really gotten ready for, because it's going to be specific to us. We'll have to adjust to that and that will have to be done on the sideline.

On CB Ty Law at practice…

He looked spry [smiles]. He got a decent amount of reps. He didn't seem to be too winded. He has been doing a lot of work. It's different than the change-of-direction and the football-specific stuff, but considering where he's starting from, I think we're very good.

On if there's a difference between being in shape and in game shape…

There's definitely a difference, just because of the movements and the contact. You can run on the treadmill and you can do all of those different things. That goes a long, long way. But it's totally different body parts moving and it's different muscles being stressed. There is some adjustment there.

On if Law's biggest challenge will be from a mental or physical standpoint…

He's in physical shape. In terms of the information we have, some of it has new names, but it's all concepts that he's been exposed to over time. It's more an association of "OK, it was called this back in the day, and now it's called something else."

On if the mental aspect or physical aspect will be more challenging for Law…

I'm not really sure because he has background in both. He's done some good work in both areas. Only time will tell.

On S Kerry Rhodes…

He's having a good season. I think he has played with a lot of different people in there. He and Darrelle [Revis] have been pretty constant and Dwight [Lowery] has gotten quite a bit of time, but there have been multiple safeties, multiple "stars" and multiple "moneys." There have been a lot of different individuals that he has to communicate with. That's such an important part of what he does.

He had done a lot of work with Eric Smith during training camp. That relationship was continuing to grow. He has the background with Abe [Abram Elam] from last year. I think that they've worked really well together.

The first and most important job that he has is getting the communication across the board. It's similar to the offensive line in terms of they all have to be coordinated. The difference is, on the offensive line, everybody is within that 7-yard area. It's like that game "Telephone," where you pass the message on. With the secondary, it's much more long-distance communication, such as hand signals and things like that.

On Rhodes being a playmaker…

"Playmaker," to me, has a couple of different meanings. There are the plays that you make where it could be a sack or an interception, but you also don't want to be a playmaker on the flip side where you're trying to create something that's not within the context of the defense and you make a play for the other team. Kerry has shown good discipline there.

It's really true. Sometimes you can get caught up with "I want to get a pick" or "I want to get a fumble." This isn't just Kerry, it's anybody. When you do those things, the defense stops being sound. The help that's supposed to be there isn't there, and that's when plays happen for the other team more often than you making a play.

On the kicking game against the Patriots…

[Mike] Nugent will travel with us. We'll make a decision tomorrow.

On Brett Favre's experience playing in big games…

That experience is always helpful to have, when you've played in those situations. The important thing to realize is once you get over the initial kickoff, it just becomes the same as what you've experienced time and time again. Nobody is out there thinking about "Wow, this is a big game." They're thinking about getting the assignment. You may think about that prior to the game, or that may creep in your consciousness, but once you kick off and once you get a couple of tackles and a couple of series under your belt, it's just football.

On NT Kris Jenkins…

He's been outstanding. What has allowed him to excel? One is his natural ability and his commitment in the off-season to maximizing that natural ability in terms of his weight-training, his conditioning and his quick adjustment to the 3-4 defense, and focusing on learning that technique, getting good at that technique and understanding the blocking schemes. His finish is very good as well. He is in a tight space, but he doesn't limit himself to that space because he does pursue the ball so well.

On if it's beneficial to have key players that are new to the Patriots rivalry…

We see it week in and week out. Historically, what has happened doesn't really mean anything. The Rams, last week, were 7-0 against us in the last seven games. That didn't play a role in the game on Sunday. What happened in Week 2 doesn't play a role in terms of what happens on Thursday. I think they are interesting things to look at and they are interesting things to analyze. Their direct effect on the outcome of what is in the future is not much.

On if veterans to the Jets-Patriots rivalry will feel defeated during the game if they start losing…

It wouldn't matter, rivalry or not rivalry, I wouldn't ever want to be in a situation where you're down by a touchdown or two touchdowns or any of those scenarios where you get in a mindset of "Here we go again" and it becomes some sort of self-fulfilling prophecy. That can happen in the course of any game. You just have to move on to the next play.

I know that sounds cliché, but it's so true. You can't do anything about what happened. You can't do anything about it except learn from it, correct it and move on to the next play. When you get caught up in stuff like that, you're just losing track of what's happening in front of you.

On if he is more confident with Dustin Keller since he has gained experience…

We give all of those guys [rookies] the same amount of information that we give everybody else. You want them to be exposed to it to at least have a chance to look at it and digest it. With reps and with experience, that sinks in a lot deeper because they've had the base for quite some time.

He's improving. He can continue to improve. I don't think we've limited our approach with him at all since he's been here.

On how Keller's presence affects opposing defenses…

To me, one of the reasons that Dustin was so attractive is that defending a good tight end is difficult. You can't do the same things with the coverage that you would do against tight ends that maybe aren't as explosive. New England has a very explosive tight end in Ben [Watson]. There's real value in being able to pressure the middle of the defense.

You add in Leon [Washington], which is another element of pressure in the passing game, underneath in that interior part of the defense. Now you can create some issues and, hopefully, take some of the coverage away from the perimeter.

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