Coach's Sunday News Conference

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Transcript of Jets head coach Eric Mangini's news conference after Sunday morning's training camp practice:    

We waived Clint Oldenburg as he was injured. We then signed Blair Phillips, who is a linebacker.

In terms of this morning, Brett [Favre] had his two hard-boiled eggs and a little bit of orange juice [laughter]. There was a garnish, I think, and some hashbrowns, and I can take you through minute by minute after that.

On what Favre ate first…

It was a tough call, because the eggs were mixed with the hashbrowns, so I don't know which one actually hit his mouth first. I'll film it next time [laughter].

On the penalty lap run by Favre and Nick Mangold already appearing on YouTube…

Yes, you know, those camera phones make it tough to do anything these days, doesn't it? He's one of the guys, so put the ball on the ground, he and Mangold run. That's the way, when we talked about it, he wanted it, that's the way I wanted it.

On if he needs to limit Favre's throws…

We are monitoring that and some of that is also talking to him about the things he's done early in camp, later in camp, to the pattern that he's had to be most successful in. We are definitely conscious of that and trying to learn as much about that as possible and taking all of that stuff into account as we get the prep that we need, while also making sure that he's as physically prepared as he can be.

On Favre's first two practices…

The ball comes out hard, fast, straight and long, so that's good. I wanted to make sure [Matt] Chatham didn't take his first pick and go over and give it to [Jets equipment manager] Gus Granneman and have Brett sign it later . He didn't and that was positive.

It's been a whirlwind for him and there is a lot of new information going in. We're associating it and we're progressing quickly. I think the installation schedule is actually helpful because he's getting it in segments as opposed to "We're going to do first, second, third down, two-minute, red zone all in one practice." Now you're looking at a lot of different areas that you have to focus on. We'll move into the red zone this evening, then tomorrow be able to review a lot of that stuff and tie it together.

On if the long throw to Jerricho Cotchery is an example of how Favre pressures defenses…

Yes, it's hard because I thought David [Barrett] had good coverage on him. There was a tight fit, there wasn't a big window to put it in there, but he was able to, and that adds extra pressure to the defensive backs down the field. In terms of the corners and the safeties, you'd better get back, you'd better get the correct depth because the margin for error is pretty small.

On if he was as impressed by the throw as fans were…

No, I appreciate the passion of the fans. They were cheering for everything yesterday, the handoffs, the 1-on-1s — that was great, that energy was great. But it's more going through the "Does he have the formation right, the snap count right, the Mike [linebacker] point out right, the read right, and then the throw." So there's other steps leading up to it.

On if one throw is not necessarily more impressive than another…

Yeah, I haven't put together my top-10 list of throws yet for camp [laughter].

On if Favre's throw to Cotchery would make his top-10 list…

I don't know yet. There are a couple weeks left, three weeks left.

On if Favre is still making errors with formations…

There were a couple in terms of the ballhandling where he went one way and the back went the other way. We're 25 plays into it, so there's going to be some of that. There are a lot of years from a different system that you're countering.

On what he would've done if Favre hadn't run his lap after the fumbled snap...

I didn't really think that it was an option. We had talked about it and that's the way it is and off he went.

On how Favre can improve the defense by facing him in practice…

We do face some strong-armed quarterbacks, so having that pressure on them and understanding that you have to defend the whole field and really being forced to defend the whole field I think is always good.

What we are trying to do offensively, not just with the players but with the scheme, is to constantly pressure all of the elements of the defense, so you're making sure that you're hitting on the perimeter. You've got the inside stuff covered, short, intermediate, deep, and now you have the full field that you force them to defend and that's always the goal.

You never want them to sit back and be able to say, "We can take away X, Y and Z. It's not going to happen." When you have to deal with all of the different options, you'd better be sound or else you're going to give up some plays.

On how it affects the chemistry of the offensive line with a new QB who improvises…

You never go into a meeting coaching the variations. You go in coaching what you expect to happen, what the plan is, and then if things change, then you do have rules.

For example, on any given scramble, the receivers always have scramble rules where they fit. Same thing with the defense based on the coverage. You have scramble rules: "The play breaks down and this is where the receivers are flowing, this is how you should flow."

It's really consistent with the offensive line: If things break down, you try to understand the pattern of the quarterback: "Where does he like to release to?" Some quarterbacks always scramble to throw, some scramble to run. Sometimes it's based on whether they break right or break left, what they're going to do. Each guy is a little bit different. The line and understanding the pattern is just like the receivers, and he's working out the differences in routes or adjustments.

On if there is a concern for chemistry on the line as it adjusts to a new QB…

No, they've been working with a lot of different quarterbacks and that's another reason I like to vary who is in with the first group, who is in with the second group. You have to get used to all the different patterns. You don't know when one is going to become two or two is going to become three, and if you haven't worked with those people, if you haven't heard their voice, if you haven't experienced the different things they bring to the table, it's a lot harder adjusting to that in a gameweek or for the first time in an actual game.

On how the line played prior to Favre arriving…

I've been really happy with that group. I've been happy with not just the first group but the second group and I like the disciplined courses that they are taking in the running game. I like the communication that they have both in run and pass, the way that they are able to work together when the defense would run some kind of game, or some kind of variation on the line. I like what Bill Callahan has done with the group. I've been pleased with them.

On why Favre has not been participating with the two-minute drill at the end of practice…

Yeah, that's going to come. For us, it's been first and second down today. Last night was more third down emphasis. This afternoon will be red-zone emphasis. We'll just build in. There's a lot of concepts that carry over from two-down to two-minute. The mechanics and cadence are a little bit different so instead of throwing it all on the wall and seeing what sticks, it's more targeted.

On if he wants to rest Favre in the two-minute offense…

No, that's really not part of it. The thinking was get those plays down, then build segment by segment, because I think it's easier to learn that way. That's the way we learn during the week.

On if not using the music as much is to get him acclimated…

Yes.

On if he likes the music…

He like's some type of Jones music — there's a Jones in there somewhere. I forget which Jones it is. I think he likes music. I really didn't ask him too deep about it.

On not using the music quite yet with Favre…

I'll probably wait on the music with him so I can hear the cadence and see the mechanics. It's not going away. Brian Mulligan still has a job [laughter].

If Favre expressed any soreness…

Yes. I think the first couple days of camp, everybody gets sore when they get older. I get sore sometimes getting out of bed. It's just a natural progression of things.

On David Clowney's performance in Cleveland…

He's the guy that we talked about a lot in OTAs and early in training camp, and then to come out and have the first preseason game. He just wants to make sure he's not a one-hit wonder and there's some other singles coming out here in the near future. He's doing everything we're asking him to do.

As a coach, you're really proud of guys like Brett Ratliff and Clowney when they marry their talent with work ethic and it's consistent work ethic and they see the progress. They see the development and you get to see it as well, and now it's a question of maintaining that work ethic and performing at a consistent level over time.

On how valuable Clowney can be with Favre, who can get the ball downfield…

Anytime you have speed, that's a good thing offensively because the fact that you can get the ball down the field and you have someone that can get to where the ball can go, it gets you on your heels a little bit. You enjoy speed.

On Jesse Chatman…

Chatman has been banged up here and working through some injuries. I haven't gotten to see him much in the last segment of camp, but up to that point he was doing some really positive things. I like his change of direction. He's a nifty guy. He was carving out a role on special teams, which is good.

I remember playing him in Miami and he caused some problems there when he got an opportunity. I think he's got some real potential. It's just a matter of getting out of the cold tub and out on the field.

On Dwight Lowery's development and his play vs. the Browns...

Yes, I thought the play in the Cleveland game was a really good look at what we saw in college where he got him in the end zone. He knows when the receiver enters into the end zone, now you don't want to be even with the receiver, you want to slide underneath him because you have the sideline and you have the back of the end zone as your help.

He did a nice job transitioning, sliding and then playing the ball. That was a lot of the stuff that we saw in college, the instincts. He wants to be exact on everything, which is great because that will improve his technique. His 40 time wasn't the most impressive coming out, but there's very few times that you ever see him get run by, so that's another element that you saw on tape: 40 time versus playing speed was very different.

On what he thought about Brett Ratliff at Cleveland…

I thought he did an excellent job. There were a bunch of times that you probably couldn't see it from where you guys were, but we had a run called, they brought down an extra guy in the box and he made the check. The play that he hit to Chansi [Stuckey] for 20-plus yards was a called run. When they showed an eight-man box, he made the check at the line of scrimmage and got us into the right play and was able to make the right read.

There's been times in practice as well. We put a check in the first day of training camp, really hadn't faced that defense until yesterday, and he made that check yesterday, got us on the right call, so that is encouraging because there's really good recall. It's however many days in the camp we are, now the look comes up again, he gets the group lined up and gets us into a good play. Those things are all encouraging.

The other thing is, he had a baby. I forgot to announce that. He had a little girl, Ellenor, and it's going to be Elle. So he's been a really busy man.

On if Erik Ainge is having problems with the playbook…

No, he's been fine with the playbook. It's just you have a limited number of reps, and that's sort of where he is on the totem pole. He has to take advantage of the ones that he gets, and he'll get some opportunities in the preseason games as well.

Ainge is a really bright guy, really funny guy, too. He has kind of an understated sense of humor, excellent delivery. I think he's a lot funnier, but he's the entertainment usually from the rookie group. We're banning him because we've got to see whether [Vernon] Gholston and [Dustin] Keller can deliver anything.

On if Lowery was at practice…

He started out there. He was working through something and then it just didn't go. We were going to try to go ahead and get through the practice and see where it was, but he did start out there and went over and conditioned.

On if the injury occurred in the beginning of practice or previously…

No, it was preexisting and one of those things. He was really on the border of trying to fight through it, and at that point we made the decision not to take the chance.

On Lowery's injury…

He's got a few things. I'll go with leg [laughter]. He's got a couple of legs.

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