Coach Mangini's Sunday News Conference

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Transcript of head coach Eric Mangini's news conference with members of the New York Jets media after Sunday's morning training camp practice:       

A little bit of housekeeping here: Leon [Washington] was back at practice this morning. We signed Dominic Moran, offensive lineman, and waived Justin Ayat, kicker.

What we worked on yesterday, the one practice we had, was really focused on the red area and two-minute, and those are obviously key areas we're always looking to improve. The two-minute stuff is something I really like, and I know I've talked about this before, but I learned it with Ted Marchibroda in Baltimore, where we'd always do two-minute at the end of practice, and it was a combination of working on that skill set and also working on conditioning where you have to communicate when you're the most tired.

That's when it always comes up in the game. It's either at the end of the half where you're fatigued or at the end of the game. So many games in the regular season, playoffs and Super Bowl come down to those types of drives. I was part of one that I'm really happy with in 2001 and you just see it. The two-minute drives are all drawn from actual games, actual game situations, either games that took place last year, historical games, Super Bowls, and that's where they come from, so then you can draw the parallel of what we did, the positive things they did, here's the mistakes they made, and what we did in relationship to that.

This morning was sort of the end of a four-practice block where you saw that we moved the field from backed up to the 50-yard line, from the 50 down into the red zone, then had the two-minute drive, and this is very similar to a typical work week we'd have. A guy that I've been very happy with here early on is a guy that I was really happy with early on in training camp last year, Sione Pouha. Last year at this time he had taken the off-season program and had really transformed his body, looked totally different over the course of the few months that he was working, came out, was having a really good camp before he unfortunately got injured. Now he's maintained that fitness, continued to improve his body and he's really taking to the coaching and doing a lot of good things. I think he's emerging and I'm happy with that.

On the first days of practice this year as opposed to last year …

I think what's really positive about this year is that you're drawing on a lot of past experiences. It's evolved. The schedules have evolved, the periods have evolved, the approach has evolved, and I think we are getting some really productive things done. Not that I felt that it wasn't productive last year, but if you look at anything we've been through, you can always make adjustments. I'm sure next year it'll be the same way, but I think that's been the biggest contrast.

On Darrelle Revis being able to contribute …

Every day is critical for people to be here, and every day we're putting things in. We're installing new defenses, situational defenses. There's a lot of really good teaching going on right now and very important teaching going on. What's good for the players that are here and working hard is they've got extra opportunities.

On who may benefit from Revis' missed practice repetitions …

I think Justin Miller is doing a really nice job early on. He was similar to Sione. I thought he had a very productive off-season in terms of concentrating on his position; really learning more and more about the defensive back position and getting a better feel for that. I thought his approach to learning that information has been very good.

On Justin McCareins' progress …

What I really liked last year about Justin was when he came and spoke to me about playing a bigger role on special teams and that selflessness of saying, 'OK, I may not be getting as many reps on offense as I did before, but I still want to contribute in any way possible.' And that week he was the Special Teams Player of the Week. That to me was a great example of what we're looking for in terms of everybody trying to figure out how we can do or they can do something more to help us win.

On Miller's maturation as a player and person …

I think his approach has been really sound and his consistency at practice has been very good. It's not exclusive to the defensive back position — he's working more and more as a punt returner. That's something that was one of his goals, to continue to try to figure out a way to contribute there as well as at kick returner. Sometimes early on you take the ball and you run and don't really understand how the whole scheme is unfolding, but he's working there as well. It's getting better and better each day and I'm happy with that.

On Bobby Hamilton …

Bobby is a seasoned vet and really understands the system. He really understands expectations and the approach and he's got a lot of great experience from the teams he's been on. I really like his personality and what he brings to the locker room. I think his energy is very contagious. I think he loves the game, loves being at practice and loves being a football player. It's not work for him; it's something that he's very passionate about, and we've talked about the core characteristics. He's a great example of someone that football is truly important to. This isn't something he does just to earn a living.

On Miller's status off the field …

I think things are still pending, and so that's where it is.

On disciplinary measures with Miller…

All that stuff is internal. I hope you understand.

On Tim Dwight's status for returning…

Both Tim and Matt [Chatham] are on a program, and we're going to monitor it and see. They're both guys that do a good job with all the aspects of what we ask them to do and this is no different. They're working as hard as they can. As soon as we can get them back, we will.

On Dwight and Chatham taking active roles in coaching …

They both are trying to help in any way they can. They know that right now they can't be on the field in a participatory role, but they can still help some of those guys that are getting the reps, give another set of eyes and share their experience with them.

On Laveranues Coles' approach …

I had one guy, who I'm not going to name, who early on was just always in a bad mood. Every single day he was in a bad mood, to the point of just complaining, complaining, and finally I had to say, 'Do we have an issue here? Is there a problem?' He said, 'Look, Eric, it's just how I get through the week. I'm going to do exactly what you tell me to do, it's just how I get through the week.' And at that point, I understood where he was coming from. It was just who he is.

On conversations with Coles …

Laveranues and I have had great conversations. He's dubbed me "The Penguin." It's a nickname I've embraced wholeheartedly. I have more penguins in my house now from people who have sent them than I know what to do with.

On giving Coach Mangini a new nickname …

You'll have to ask Laveranues. He's the go-to guy.

On changing the music at practice …

We like to have a broad range of music. We have a nice crowd out there and a lot of different interests; a little Mozart.

On the music's relevance to football …

From different studies, they assume — and I may be a little wrong on the technical side — Mozart's music and brainwaves are very similar, and it stimulates learning. They play it in a lot of schools around the country, kind of underneath, very low, to do that. So I thought if that's the case, why not give it a shot?

On research of the music stimulating learning …

I bought all the Baby Mozart when Jake and Luke were young. I didn't really know why I was buying it. But then talking to different people, somebody brought it up and someone else reinforced it. I looked into it, saw that there had been studies on it, so I thought there might be something there.

On who is the disc jockey …

Brain Mulligan [director of events and game operations]. He puts it all together. We'll have guest DJs with input sometimes, and there may be some requests. I thought it was a little too slow in the warmup stage, a little too ballad-y.

On Coach Mangini having a say in Mulligan's selections …

No, I don't get a playlist every day, but just kind of a feel.

On music during intermissions and water breaks …

I was thinking about that today during break. What would be the best music right now? Do you look for something a little lower, do you look for something that transitions? I'm not sure. Maybe you want silence so guys can talk. I'm not sure what the best approach is. But I'm open to suggestions.

On music that has a negative impact on learning …

I'm not sure about that. I know you can associate experiences with music. That's what I learned last night talking to someone, that you can actually like a song and build the association. Later on, the song can trigger that emotion very strongly. I'm not sure exactly how it works, but I'm going to find out.

On David Harris' role on the team …

David has got to define his role, and he's going to get opportunities like everybody else to define his role. With all the rookies, Chansi [Stuckey], Jacob [Bender] and Darrelle [Revis] right on down the board, they have to define what their role will be. The first thing they have to do is make the team, the second thing is they have to figure out a way to make us win. Their role will be defined by how quickly they figure that out.

On the players adjusting to defense …

I think as you look at the early days here in training camp, and even OTAs, last year you had to get through the base terminology and had to get through the very core adjustments. If the wide moves to the other side, the receiver goes to the slot. There's learning involved there, and now with that base in place, you can see that they're building on it and there's a lot of smart guys that have worked at learning the defense, and now you can interchange roles. One guy is playing this spot. One play, he switches over; the next play, safety can go to corner. You've got that ability now because if you understand the concept, then you can put the parts in different places and still be sound.

On the defense giving opponents trouble …

What I've always liked about the 3-4 is that you have the flexibility to have that double bubble over the guard. The standard what you think of as the traditional 3-4, but you can move one of those ends down and rush an outside linebacker. And conceptually it's the same exact thing as a 4-3, or you can bring both ends down and rush both outside linebackers and now you have like a 46, the Buddy Ryan "Bear" look, and with those four linebackers, those four pieces can replace defensive linemen to build any front you want, and you're not forced to adjust with the secondary on movement, you can just adjust with linebackers. When you have four big guys in there, they can really only go to certain spots and the little guys always have to adjust. That's what I like about it; the flexibility to build whatever you want to build.

On Juan Wong being a developmental player …

I just learned the other night, we were in a staff meeting and Jason Michael [assistant tight ends coach] said when he was out in Oakland, Juan Wong was doing a fellowship and they were roommates. I didn't know they had had that relationship. I think it's great to be able to get some international players and incorporate them and give them the opportunity to make the team. He's working at it and I'm sure it's a big transition.

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