Matthew Stafford and Others Come Calling

031609_matthew_stafford_320.jpg


The Jets are doing their due diligence in this draft process and their prospect visits today included Georgia QB Matthew Stafford.

In three seasons at UGa, Stafford compiled a 27-7 mark as a starter. The 6'3", 228-pound Stafford set school marks his junior campaign with 25 TD passes and 3,499 yards of total offense, and his 3,459 passing yards ranked second in school history.

Many pundits expect the Lions, who hold the top overall selection in the upcoming draft, to make a play for Stafford. Detroit is coming off a winless season and its chief rival — the Chicago Bears — just landed one of the most physically gifted quarterbacks in the game with the acquisition of Jay Cutler.

Malcolm Jenkins, who received the Thorpe Award as the nation's top DB, was also in attendance. The 6'0", 204-pounder is a product of Piscataway High School. (And on a little aside here, the state of New Jersey is producing some wonderful football talent and the locals should be proud.) Jenkins, who had 11 interceptions at Ohio State, wants to play cornerback but he's versatile and has the ability to line up and be an effective safety.

"With the Jets, it would be good to be near home and around my family, Jenkins wrote in his draft diary blog on* sportingnews.com*. "I'm excited for the visit. What's intriguing about the Jets to me is that Rex Ryan is the coach, and he was the defensive coordinator for the Ravens. That Baltimore group was the defense I grew up loving, so it would be an exciting thing to play in the defense that he'll bring to the Jets."

Rutgers was represented by WR Kenny Britt, whom we wrote about in our WR positional preview that is featured on the site today. Florida WR Percy Harvin, also in that story, is expected to come in for a visit Friday.

You're not going to find any college football stats on Seton Hall's Paul Gause because the 5'11" point guard played on the hardwood for the Pirates. This is an interesting visit and we urge you to read this feature on Gause by Brendan Prunty in the Newark Star-Ledger.

This article has been reproduced in a new format and may be missing content or contain faulty links. Please use the Contact Us link in our site footer to report an issue.

Advertising