6 Facts About the Jets’ Round 6 Picks

Posted Apr 30, 2017

McGuire Did it All for the Ragin' Cajuns, Clark and Jones Switched Positions in College

Elijah McGuire

1. Young Buck — McGuire is the youngest of six siblings as he has one brother and four sisters. McGuire was named after his father, Elijah McGuire Sr., who passed away when McGuire Jr. was 12.

2. Ragin’ Returner — Not only was McGuire productive as both a rusher and pass catcher, but he made an impact on special teams as well. He returned punts for three seasons for the Ragin’ Cajuns, averaging 8.1 yards per return.

Jeremy Clark
1. Record Breaker —
When Clark was selected No. 197 overall, he became the 11th Michigan product to be picked in the 2017 Draft, the most in program history. The Wolverines had 10 players drafted in the 1972 and 1974 drafts.

2. Switcharoo — Clark entered Michigan’s football program as a tall, skinny safety and left a thick corner (220 pounds). While he was successful on the outside prior to tearing his ACL during the 2016 season, he was originally upset when head coach Jim Harbaugh informed him of his new role.

“I had a convo with my dad,” Clark said in an interview with Michigan Live. “I was like, 'Dad,I don't know what they're doing. They've got me playing a different position.’ He just told me, 'Keep your mind open. You never know it could work out for the best.' And it did.”

Derrick Jones
1. Balancing Act — Perhaps Jones’ biggest problem was staying at one position. The Rebels’ coaching staff moved Jones from CB to WR and back to the secondary midway through his senior season. As a result, he wasn’t able to fully settle into one spot. He racked up 175 yards and two touchdowns on offense as well as 54 tackles and two picks on defense.

2. Proving Coach Right — When Jones was a freshmen, Ole Miss defensive coordinator Dave Wommack believed Jones was going to make “a lot of money someday,” which always pushes him on the field.

"It just makes me want to go work harder, knowing that he has that kind of confidence in me," he told the Clarion Ledger. "I want to make him right."